COVER REVEAL: Song of Forever Rains by EJ Mellow

COVER REVEAL: Song of Forever Rains by EJ Mellow

It’s here! The cover of EJ Mellow’s next dark romantic fantasy, SONG OF THE FOREVER RAINS! Isn’t it stunning! ✨

𝐒𝐘𝐍𝐎𝐏𝐒𝐈𝐒⁣

⁣𝘉𝘦𝘸𝘢𝘳𝘦 𝘸𝘩𝘦𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘴𝘰𝘯𝘨𝘣𝘪𝘳𝘥 𝘴𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘴.⁣⁣⁣⁣
⁣⁣⁣⁣
The Thief Kingdom is a place hidden within the world of Aadilor. Many whisper of its existence, but few have found this place, where magic and pleasure abound. There, the mysterious Thief King reigns supreme with the help of the Mousai, a trio of revered and feared sorceresses.⁣⁣⁣⁣
⁣⁣⁣⁣
Larkyra Bassette may be the youngest of the Mousai, but when she sings her voice has the power to slay monsters. When it’s discovered the Duke of Lachlan is siphoning a poisonous drug from the Thief Kingdom and using it to abuse his tenants, Larkyra is offered her first solo mission to stop the duke. Eager to prove herself, Larkyra accepts by posing as the duke’s potential bride. But her plans grow complicated when she finds herself drawn to Lord Darius Mekenna, Lachlan’s rightful heir. Soon she suspects Darius has his own motivations for ridding Lachlan of the corrupt Duke. Larkyra and Darius must learn to trust each other if there is to be any hope of saving the people of Lachlan – and themselves.⁣⁣⁣⁣
⁣⁣⁣⁣
Welcome to the world of Aadilor, where lords and ladies can be murderers and thieves, and the most alluring notes are often the deadliest. Dare to listen?⁣ ✨

Publishes July 1st 2021. Pre-order + add to Goodreads today!

Pre-Order link:

http://bit.ly/SongOfTheForeverRains
Goodreads link: https://bit.ly/3mB2ww2

A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara

A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara

Synopsis:

Brace yourself for the most astonishing, challenging, upsetting, and profoundly moving book in many a season. An epic about love and friendship in the twenty-first century that goes into some of the darkest places fiction has ever traveled and yet somehow improbably breaks through into the light. Truly an amazement—and a great gift for its readers.

When four classmates from a small Massachusetts college move to New York to make their way, they’re broke, adrift, and buoyed only by their friendship and ambition. There is kind, handsome Willem, an aspiring actor; JB, a quick-witted, sometimes cruel Brooklyn-born painter seeking entry to the art world; Malcolm, a frustrated architect at a prominent firm; and withdrawn, brilliant, enigmatic Jude, who serves as their center of gravity. 

Over the decades, their relationships deepen and darken, tinged by addiction, success, and pride. Yet their greatest challenge, each comes to realize, is Jude himself, by midlife a terrifyingly talented litigator yet an increasingly broken man, his mind and body scarred by an unspeakable childhood, and haunted by what he fears is a degree of trauma that he’ll not only be unable to overcome—but that will define his life forever.

Rating:
5 / 5 🌟

Photo by Cerize Sicat

Review:


This was a book that I was scared to pick up for a very long time. Now, i’ve finally read and finished it. I knew it was going to be incredibly sad but damn, I never thought I could shed tears everyday after reading 30 pages. It took me a whole month to finish it because I can’t devour it without preparing myself mentally first. I had to watch funny animes to lift my mood up after finishing a chapter of it.

We get a glimpse of the Jude’s life and his friends. They’re struggle to success, to life, and practically to everything. The ending too was so heart wrenching but beautifully written. The details when the characters are talking about modeling houses, law, art, theater, and many more aren’t shallow at all and are well executed. I think Yanagihara did a lot of research for this book because it shows.

It’s true that what’s more terrifying in the world isn’t spirits or ghosts; it’s the race of men and what they can do. I’m so incredibly sad for Jude. What happened to him is so fucked up I can’t help but cry and curse every time. What’s worse is knowing that there are people across the globe that’s experiencing it too. We live in such a cruel world.

I don’t think I could ever read it again because it took a toll on me but I would highly recommend it to people looking for a sucker punch to the heart. It’s an incredible book through and through.

Favorite Quotes from the Book:

As you get older, you realized that really, there were very few people you truly wanted to be around for more than a few days at a time, and yet here you were with someone you wanted to be around for years, even if he was at his most opaque and confusing.

You won’t understand what I mean now, but someday you will: the only trick of friendship, I think, is to find people who are better than you are—not smarter, not cooler, but kinder, and more generous, and more forgiving—and then to appreciate them for what they can teach you, and to try to listen to them when they tell you something about yourself, no matter how bad—or good—it might be, and to trust them, which is the hardest thing of all. But the best, as well.

…things get broken, and sometimes they get repaired, and in most cases, you realize that no matter what gets damaged, life rearranges itself to compensate for your loss, sometimes wonderfully.

REVIEW: The Secret History by Donna Tartt

REVIEW: The Secret History by Donna Tartt

Rating:

5/5 ✨

Synopsis:

Under the influence of their charismatic classics professor, a group of clever, eccentric misfits at an elite New England college discover a way of thinking and living that is a world away from the humdrum existence of their contemporaries. But when they go beyond the boundaries of normal morality they slip gradually from obsession to corruption and betrayal, and at last – inexorably – into evil. 

Review:

I’ve been seeing this book for so long all over the internet and I finally got around to reading it. I was so excited to get my hands on it since it was highly recommended by friends. I didn’t know what stories fall under the category of Dark Academia and now that I’ve read this, I have a solid idea of what they are. The category name itself explains it all to be honest – I don’t know why I haven’t thought of it before. The story is dark, verging on the mysterious and suspenseful.

I must start this review with nothing but praise for Donna Tartt. I have never read any of her works before and I was blown away by her writing. This is topnotch writing. The way I would describe it would be descriptive, elegant, and somewhat hypnotic.

The story itself is so addictive that I couldn’t stop reading it. I want to know what happened so badly. I want to know what Henry is thinking. I want to know what happened in Francis’s country house. I want to know why Charles is always drinking. I want to know everything and Tartt told the story in such a beautiful way that you can’t help but admire her work and get scared of the events she’s telling at the same time. It’s the kind of story that I crave. I’m disappointed that I’m not a part of a classics class right now. I would also love to wear some crisp suits, have cocktails at lunch, and talk in a dead language. All that minus the murder part lol, my conscience wouldn’t be able to take that.

I can just imagine this book as a movie or a tv series. How wonderful the setting would be. The costumes, The dialogues. How chilling.

All in all, this has successfully made it to my favorites list and would definitely recommend it to people seeking a beautifully written murder-mystery book.

Favorite lines from the book:

“Forgive me, for all the things I did but mostly for the ones that I did not.”

“I suppose at one time in my life I might have had any number of stories, but now there is no other. This is the only story I will ever be able to tell.”

“But how,” said Charles, who was close to tears, “how can you possibly justify cold-blooded murder?’
Henry lit a cigarette. “I prefer to think of it,” he had said, “as redistribution of matter.”

“Some things are too terrible to grasp at once. Other things – naked, sputtering, indelible in their horror – are too terrible to really grasp ever at all. It is only later, in solitude, in memory that the realization dawns: when the ashes are cold; when the mourners have departed; when one looks around and finds oneself – quite to one’s surprise – in an entirely different world.”

– Donna Tart, The Secret History
Dekada ’70 by Lualhati Bautista (Tagalog Review)

Dekada ’70 by Lualhati Bautista (Tagalog Review)

Rating:

4.75/5 🌟

Synopsis:


Ito ay isang pagsasalaysay ng mga pangyayari sa buhay ng isang pamilyang nahagip sa kalagitnaan ng mga magulong dekada ng 1970. Tinatalakay nito kung paano nakibaka ang isang mag-anak na nasa gitnang antas ng lipunan, at kung paano nila hinarap ang mga pagbabago na nagbigay ng kapangyarihan upang bumangon laban sa pamahalaang Marcos.

Review:


Sa tinagal tagal na nasa amin itong libro na to, ngayon ko lang sya tinangkang basahin. Hindi dahil sa hindi ako interesado o dahil sa tingin ko eh di ko ito magugustuhan; kung di dahil sa tingin ko’y dudurugin nito ang puso ko.

Napakadaming naihayag ni Lualhati Bautista sa maiksing nobela na ito. Tama naman ang nasa isip kong dudurugin nito ang puso ko. Mangilang beses din akong nalungkot, natakot, naiyak ng sobra sobra, at nagalit sa gobyernong sumira at kumitil ng napakadaming Pilipino habang binabasa ang nobela niya. Napakasakit basahin ng mga pahinang naglalathala ng pagkamatay ni Jason. Damang dama mo ang paghihinagpis na naramdaman ni Amanda. Hindi ko lubos maisip na ganito ang nangyayari sa mga taong nahuhuli at napapatay. Abut abot na pang to-torture. Jusko po. Mga taong minassacre, inagawan ng lupa, pinag ekperimentuhan, tinanggalan ng kalayaan. Napakarami pa. Para bang ang binabasa ko ngayon ay hindi mga pangyayari ilang dekada na ang nakalipas, para bang binabasa ko ang mga nangyayari ngayon ngunit napalitan lang ang mga pangalan at petsa.

(Photo by Cerize Sicat)

Maganda din ang pagkakasulat nya tungkol sa ideya ng mga tao noong mga panahong ’70 na ang babae ay dapat pirmi lamang sa bahay at kuntento na dapat sila bilang asawa’t ina. “It’s a man’s world.” na laging sinasabi ng asawa ni Amanda. Nakakalungkot din ang kanyang mga pinagdaanan. Pero gusto ko din na kahit napaka dedikado ni Julian sa gubyerno noon ay namulat din sya at natuto. Nagsisilbi itong ihemplo na ang lahat ng tao ay may kakayahang magbago.

Hindi ko pa din napapanuod ng buo ang pelikula nito. Nakikita ko lang ang ilang maiiksing videos na pinapakita noon dati sa telebisyon. Alam ko lang ay si Christopher de Leon ang gumanap na tatay at sa totoo lang ay bagay na bagay sa kanya ang character ni Julian. Balak ko na din panuorin ang pelikula matapos kong ipost itong review ko.

Kung ikaw ay naghahanap ng isang nobela na tumatalakay sa malagim na mga pangyayari noong Dekada ’70. Mairerekomenda ko ito kung ikaw ay matibay na sikmura dahil may mga malagim na eksena, pero napakaganda ng pagkakasulat.

Maraming salamat sa pagbasa ng aking review! Isa ito sa mga binasa ko para sa #Wikathon ngayong taon.

Fighting for Hope by Jazel L. Faith (Book 1 of Melting Hearts)

Fighting for Hope by Jazel L. Faith (Book 1 of Melting Hearts)

Rating:

2.75 / 5 ⭐


Synopsis:
Hope Valentino with a heart brimming with abhorrence and vengeance, she is set on fulfilling the solemn statement from a decade ago.
However, fate plans differently. Her firm belief on trust gradually withers when she meets Tyler Rivera. Only he can melt the glacial walls she built throughout years of mental and physical torment.

Review:
I got this book for free during its sale on Amazon.

In my honest opinion, I think the writing is good – the author clearly was able to express what she wanted to say. However, the plot and characters were kind of generic. I’ve read books and watched several movies/tv series that has the same scenarios and ending. Death of a family member/loved one > Practice Fighting > Avenge their Death.

Hope was not talking to anyone at school or anyone else and everyone thought she was mute. I just wished it was mentioned at least once that she knows sign language to make some rapport on the idea. It was also mentioned several times that she does not want to trust anyone because that’s what her father told her and she never trusted anyone for years. Yet she trusted Tyler after just a week of training.

I also noticed that the author liked to use high fallutine words. It was something I noted immediately and it threw me off. I thought it was only going to happen once or twice but it was done throughout the entire book. I don’t mind reading them and searching them up on a dictionary once in a while but I just think that it wasn’t friendly at all to put that many difficult words in a less than 300 paged book.

All in all, I just think this book wasn’t for me at all. The plot line could have been better. I enjoyed the part where the mother and her new lover killed Hope’s dad but that’s the only part that got me interested. I thought it was going to be a suspense-thriller book but I was wrong. I think it is such a huge achievement to write a book and have it published at such a young age. I congratulate you! I hope this review wouldn’t discourage you and I am really hoping you would write more. I just happen to enjoy a different genre of books. 😅

The Dark Book of Gwenna Luna: Six Dreams of the Supernatural by Guenther Primig (Rory Midhani, Illustrator)

The Dark Book of Gwenna Luna: Six Dreams of the Supernatural by Guenther Primig (Rory Midhani, Illustrator)

Synopsis:

“There’s a lot of horrible things to be afraid of. I want to stop something. I want to save someone. I want to know I did some good, have a use. I want to say to myself, just once: “Bam. Good witch.” Gwenna Luna is seventeen and on the run. And she dreams of strange things: A child-eating giant who lives in the woods; ghosts haunting a laboratory; a valley of the undead; a magical book and Jack the Ripper‘s escape from hell… Why did Gwenna Luna seek out the help of a jaded psychiatrist to unravel these dreams? And is it wise to listen to a girl who just may be… a witch?

Photo by Cerize Sicat

Rating:
4.75 / 5 ⭐

 

Review:

I was given a copy of this book in exchange of an honest review.

For the past year and a half, I think i’m slowly figuring out the genres that I truly like and would read in a heartbeat. To mention my top three, it’s going to be Horror, Murder-Mystery, and Historical Fiction. I have several other genres that I truly like but these three would be my ride-or-die. The Dark Book of Gwenna Luna certainly falls in one of this categories. Books about supernatural entities has always fascinated me and kept me awake at night. This book certainly lived up to my expectations.

It contains six stories that Gwenna Luna saw and wanted to tell – or rather show Dr. Wilson. All six short tales are interesting and spooky in their own way. My favorite is definitely Grollbein. Something about kids talking to someone – a giant who eats children in this case – outside their window really freaks me out. I could just imagine it staring at me from my window while i’m lying down on my bed. My second favorite would be The Coachman because of how Guenther Primig described the scenario and the idea of the character being transported from present day to the Victorian Era (is it Victorian??) was so unnerving for me. There are scenes in the book so grotesque and good that I actually wish someone could make Gwenna Luna’s story into a short film or tv series. It would definitely scare a whole bunch of kids and adults alike. Here’s my individual ratings of the short stories:

1. The Coachman – 4.75 ⭐
2. Grollbein – 5 ⭐
3. The Valley Without Laughter – 4.5 ⭐
4. Ardale Ghost – 4 ⭐
5. A Pawnshop Near Whitechapel – 4.75 ⭐
6. Wishes Three – 4.5 ⭐

Photo by Cerize Sicat

So all in all, I absolutely enjoyed this book. The illustrations are fascinating as well. I love how the cover corresponds to the illustrations found inside. I would recommend this to all horror enthusiasts and those who are looking for a good scare. Thank you so much Guenther, for giving me a copy of your work. I absolutely adored it. A round of applause for you!  I can’t wait to read the next book. 

The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood REVIEW

The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood REVIEW

(Photo by Cerize Sicat)

Rating:

5/5 Stars 🌟

Synopsis:

Margaret Atwood takes the art of storytelling to new heights in a dazzling novel that unfolds layer by astonishing layer and concludes in a brilliant and wonderfully satisfying twist. Told in a style that magnificently captures the colloquialisms and clichés of the 1930s and 1940s, The Blind Assassin is a richly layered and uniquely rewarding experience.

It opens with these simple, resonant words: “Ten days after the war ended, my sister drove a car off the bridge.” They are spoken by Iris, whose terse account of her sister Laura’s death in 1945 is followed by an inquest report proclaiming the death accidental. But just as the reader expects to settle into Laura’s story, Atwood introduces a novel-within-a-novel. Entitled The Blind Assassin, it is a science fiction story told by two unnamed lovers who meet in dingy backstreet rooms. When we return to Iris, it is through a 1947 newspaper article announcing the discovery of a sailboat carrying the dead body of her husband, a distinguished industrialist.

For the past twenty-five years, Margaret Atwood has written works of striking originality and imagination. In The Blind Assassin, she stretches the limits of her accomplishments as never before, creating a novel that is entertaining and profoundly serious. The Blind Assassin proves once again that Atwood is one of the most talented, daring, and exciting writers of our time. Like The Handmaid’s Tale, it is destined to become a classic.

Review:

This is my second Margaret Atwood book and I have to say, I quite enjoy her works. The book made it to my favourites of the year even though it’s just May. I read this last February and I am still thinking about this book months after I read it, so I decided to write a review.

To start it off, I just want to say that this was a novel that gave me a huge wave of sadness after uncovering everything it has to offer. It’s the kind of book that’s quite hard to put into a specific genre; at first, I thought it was a coming of age story but then it could also be historical fiction as well as mystery. In several hundred pages of the book, she was able to tackle family history, sibling rivalry, obsessions, mental health, disastrous marriage, and a whole lot more. I have to say that she really has the knack of creating strong female leads with quite the personality. I enjoyed the journey with Iris all throughout this book specially with Margaret Atwood’s dark humour.

It’s mysterious and thrilling and sad most of all. This was definitely a slow burn, but I get why she had to pace it that way. Stories within a story and even newspaper articles accompany those; You must unravel them first before getting that big ending. There were moments where I thought I knew what happened and what will happen next, only to find out that I was played, and then Atwood pulled the rug under my feet.

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As you can see, I really did enjoy this book and would highly suggest it to anyone who would want to try Margaret Atwood’s work in the future. I’m pretty sure I didn’t make much sense from this review because it’s the kind of book you must read for yourself in order to understand it.

My Favorite quotes from this book:

“Beginnings are sudden, but also insidious. They creep up on you sideways, they keep to the shadows, they lurk unrecognized. Then, later, they spring.”

“The only way you can write the truth is to assume that what you set down will never be read… not even by yourself.”

“The best way to keep a secret is to pretend there isn’t one.”

“We’ll choose knowledge no matter what, we’ll maim ourselves in the process, we’ll stick our hands into the flames for it if necessary. Curiosity is not our only motive; love or grief or despair or hatred is what drives us.”

The Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic (Grishaverse) by Leigh Bardugo

The Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic (Grishaverse) by Leigh Bardugo

Synopsis:

Love speaks in flowers. Truth requires thorns.

Travel to a world of dark bargains struck by moonlight, of haunted towns and hungry woods, of talking beasts and gingerbread golems, where a young mermaid’s voice can summon deadly storms and where a river might do a lovestruck boy’s bidding but only for a terrible price.

Inspired by myth, fairy tale, and folklore, #1 New York Times–bestselling author Leigh Bardugo has crafted a deliciously atmospheric collection of short stories filled with betrayals, revenge, sacrifice, and love.

Perfect for new readers and dedicated fans, these tales will transport you to lands both familiar and strange—to a fully realized world of dangerous magic that millions have visited through the novels of the Grishaverse.

This collection of six stories includes three brand-new tales, all of them lavishly illustrated with art that changes with each turn of the page, culminating in six stunning full-spread illustrations as rich in detail as the stories themselves.

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Photo by Cerize Sicat

Rating:

🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟 / 5 stars

Review:

If you haven’t noticed it yet, I have a very dark and twisted mind that enjoy dark and twisted stories. Leigh Bardugo has never failed me with those. Though of course, for me, the Grisha Trilogy is the weakest of all. Six of Crows still reigns my favorite and very CLOSELYYYYY followed by this one. The stories she weaved sent shivers down my spine and yet I couldn’t put it down. Not to mention the fantastic artwork by Sara Kipin which is jaw dropping gorgeous that I kept staring at it and featured it numerous times in my instagram account.

We all know all about the bedtime stories of the handsome prince or the fair-haired princess of faraway lands and how their suitors must complete tasks in order to win their hand. Well, Bardugo knows that that’s not the case all the time. Sometimes dark and terrible things happen, the beautiful girl is not what you expect her to be, and not everyone gets to have a happy ending. I absolutely love dark retellings, but what I love about this one is that there’s an essence of uniqueness to it that overpowers the original story and makes it more endearing and fantastic.

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I wouldn’t give you a review of each of the stories because I feel I might give too much away, and I really want you to experience the dark stories for yourself. I’ve arranged everything from my favorite to least. 😊

  1. The Witch of Duva – Absolutely fantastic! Quite disturbing, yes. But fantastic! THIS GAVE ME CHILLS. My mouth is literally hanging open after reading it that I had to remind myself to close it.
  2. When Water Sang Fire
  3. The Too-Clever Fox
  4. Ayama and the Thorn Wood
  5. The Soldier Prince
  6. Little Knife – It bore me for a bit. It’s interesting but not at par with the others.

As you can see, I’ve enjoyed the book so much. I recommend this to anyone who enjoys retellings like I do. If you haven’t read any of Leigh’s book, that’s also fine as this doesn’t rely heavily on her Grisha world or characters. And before I end this review, I just want to share some of my favorite lines from the book.

“So shut the window tight and make sure the latch is fastened. Dark things have a way of slipping in through narrow spaces.”

“Come now, Ayama. You know how the stories go. Interesting things only happen to pretty girls;”

“She held each sorrow like a chafing grain and grew her grudges like pearls.”

“Magic doesn’t require beauty,’ she said. ‘Easy magic is pretty. Great magic asks that you trouble the waters. It requires a disruption, something new.”

Thank you for reading! 😊

Finding Chika by Mitch Albom Review

Finding Chika by Mitch Albom Review

Photo by Cerize Sicat

Synopsis:

Bestselling author Mitch Albom returns to nonfiction for the first time in more than a decade in this poignant memoir that celebrates Chika, a young Haitian orphan whose short life would forever change his heart.Chika Jeune was born three days before the devastating earthquake that decimated Haiti in 2010. She spent her infancy in a landscape of extreme poverty, and when her mother died giving birth to a baby brother, Chika was brought to The Have Faith Haiti Orphanage that Albom operates in Port Au Prince.With no children of their own, the forty-plus children who live, play, and go to school at the orphanage have become family to Mitch and his wife, Janine. Chika’s arrival makes a quick impression. Brave and self-assured, even as a three-year-old, she delights the other kids and teachers. But at age five, Chika is suddenly diagnosed with something a doctor there says, “No one in Haiti can help you with.”Mitch and Janine bring Chika to Detroit, hopeful that American medical care can soon return her to her homeland. Instead, Chika becomes a permanent part of their household, and their lives, as they embark on a two-year, around-the-world journey to find a cure. As Chika’s boundless optimism and humor teach Mitch the joys of caring for a child, he learns that a relationship built on love, no matter what blows it takes, can never be lost.Told in hindsight, and through illuminating conversations with Chika herself, this is Albom at his most poignant and vulnerable. Finding Chika is a celebration of a girl, her adoptive guardians, and the incredible bond they formed — a devastatingly beautiful portrait of what it means to be a family, regardless of how it is made.

Rating:

🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟 / 5 stars

Review:

This is heart-wrenching and my first 5 star read for 2020. I cried so much that my eyes were puffy when I went to work, and my co-worker asked why my eyes are swollen and I said, “Because I read Mitch Albom’s new book and I couldn’t stop crying last night”.

I loved how Mitch told Chika’s journey, starting from the very beginning until her last breath. It’s always so difficult to read about dying children because they have not experienced life to the fullest, and yet they are one of the strongest when it comes to battling life. And it is so heart breaking because no one should ever experience that. I can’t imagine the pain DIPG has given Chika. It’s amazing how much courage a child has. Just imagining all those hospital trip, surgeries, and medicine is enough to make an adult feel helpless but not Chika. For such a small body, she is radiating with courage. I always wondered if Mitch and Janine have children and this answered it. He told us how he was so focused on accepting jobs for the fear that no one would take him again, how they became stand in parents of their nephews and nieces, and how Janine cried on Christmas mornings. It was so raw and honest; it gave me a punch to the gut. I really appreciate that he included some of that private information about their life because it makes you understand it more.

All in all, this is a good book about life and the making of a small family. I would suggest you have a handkerchief ready when you read this book. It’s a breath of fresh air when I read his work; A break from all the murder-mystery, fiction, and fantasy books that I always gravitate to. He makes me cry most of the time, but there are always lessons and positivity in those pages which I always look for.

Divan of Shah by Shah Asad Rizvi

Divan of Shah by Shah Asad Rizvi

48696047

 

Rating:

3/5 stars 🌟

 

Synopsis:

The Divan of Shah represents an unconscious longing for union within. The author tapped into the collective unexplored and perhaps his own realm of dreams. He ascribed those thoughts and feelings into poetry. This one is a thoughtful collection of poetic lines that invites the reader into the dimension of love, which happens to be the idea of a reflective mirror having no color yet for all colors of the embodiment are reflected.

 

Review:

I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

Thank you so much Shah for giving me a copy of your book! This is my first read for 2020 and I was not expecting to receive an arc this early in the year. I feel so honored!

I’ve read several poetry books before and I have to say that this is probably the first poetry book I’ve encountered that is overflowing with content. There’re a hundred and six poems in here. They are beautiful and easy to comprehend. I felt a connection to some of them, however, there are also some poems that felt a bit off for me. I appreciate that he writes so passionately about dance and it shows in his work. I just wish that the poems were arranged in a way that makes sense. I think they’re all jumbled but there are times where I feel as if there’s a pattern and it somehow tells a story and then it goes off and the pattern is broken.

Overall though I think that it’s good, but it could have been better with a few tweaks here and there. I think the author really loves what he is doing, and I would encourage for him to continue writing. I would love to suggest this book to my friends who love reading poetry books.

Thank you again, Shah! And well done.

Go ahead and add it to your Goodreads shelf: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48696047-divan-of-shah

Get it on Amazon:                                                                  https://www.amazon.com/Divan-Shah-Asad-Rizvi/dp/1687673586