Fighting for Hope by Jazel L. Faith (Book 1 of Melting Hearts)

Fighting for Hope by Jazel L. Faith (Book 1 of Melting Hearts)

Rating:

2.75 / 5 ⭐


Synopsis:
Hope Valentino with a heart brimming with abhorrence and vengeance, she is set on fulfilling the solemn statement from a decade ago.
However, fate plans differently. Her firm belief on trust gradually withers when she meets Tyler Rivera. Only he can melt the glacial walls she built throughout years of mental and physical torment.

Review:
I got this book for free during its sale on Amazon.

In my honest opinion, I think the writing is good – the author clearly was able to express what she wanted to say. However, the plot and characters were kind of generic. I’ve read books and watched several movies/tv series that has the same scenarios and ending. Death of a family member/loved one > Practice Fighting > Avenge their Death.

Hope was not talking to anyone at school or anyone else and everyone thought she was mute. I just wished it was mentioned at least once that she knows sign language to make some rapport on the idea. It was also mentioned several times that she does not want to trust anyone because that’s what her father told her and she never trusted anyone for years. Yet she trusted Tyler after just a week of training.

I also noticed that the author liked to use high fallutine words. It was something I noted immediately and it threw me off. I thought it was only going to happen once or twice but it was done throughout the entire book. I don’t mind reading them and searching them up on a dictionary once in a while but I just think that it wasn’t friendly at all to put that many difficult words in a less than 300 paged book.

All in all, I just think this book wasn’t for me at all. The plot line could have been better. I enjoyed the part where the mother and her new lover killed Hope’s dad but that’s the only part that got me interested. I thought it was going to be a suspense-thriller book but I was wrong. I think it is such a huge achievement to write a book and have it published at such a young age. I congratulate you! I hope this review wouldn’t discourage you and I am really hoping you would write more. I just happen to enjoy a different genre of books. 😅

The Dark Book of Gwenna Luna: Six Dreams of the Supernatural by Guenther Primig (Rory Midhani, Illustrator)

The Dark Book of Gwenna Luna: Six Dreams of the Supernatural by Guenther Primig (Rory Midhani, Illustrator)

Synopsis:

“There’s a lot of horrible things to be afraid of. I want to stop something. I want to save someone. I want to know I did some good, have a use. I want to say to myself, just once: “Bam. Good witch.” Gwenna Luna is seventeen and on the run. And she dreams of strange things: A child-eating giant who lives in the woods; ghosts haunting a laboratory; a valley of the undead; a magical book and Jack the Ripper‘s escape from hell… Why did Gwenna Luna seek out the help of a jaded psychiatrist to unravel these dreams? And is it wise to listen to a girl who just may be… a witch?

Photo by Cerize Sicat

Rating:
4.75 / 5 ⭐

 

Review:

I was given a copy of this book in exchange of an honest review.

For the past year and a half, I think i’m slowly figuring out the genres that I truly like and would read in a heartbeat. To mention my top three, it’s going to be Horror, Murder-Mystery, and Historical Fiction. I have several other genres that I truly like but these three would be my ride-or-die. The Dark Book of Gwenna Luna certainly falls in one of this categories. Books about supernatural entities has always fascinated me and kept me awake at night. This book certainly lived up to my expectations.

It contains six stories that Gwenna Luna saw and wanted to tell – or rather show Dr. Wilson. All six short tales are interesting and spooky in their own way. My favorite is definitely Grollbein. Something about kids talking to someone – a giant who eats children in this case – outside their window really freaks me out. I could just imagine it staring at me from my window while i’m lying down on my bed. My second favorite would be The Coachman because of how Guenther Primig described the scenario and the idea of the character being transported from present day to the Victorian Era (is it Victorian??) was so unnerving for me. There are scenes in the book so grotesque and good that I actually wish someone could make Gwenna Luna’s story into a short film or tv series. It would definitely scare a whole bunch of kids and adults alike. Here’s my individual ratings of the short stories:

1. The Coachman – 4.75 ⭐
2. Grollbein – 5 ⭐
3. The Valley Without Laughter – 4.5 ⭐
4. Ardale Ghost – 4 ⭐
5. A Pawnshop Near Whitechapel – 4.75 ⭐
6. Wishes Three – 4.5 ⭐

Photo by Cerize Sicat

So all in all, I absolutely enjoyed this book. The illustrations are fascinating as well. I love how the cover corresponds to the illustrations found inside. I would recommend this to all horror enthusiasts and those who are looking for a good scare. Thank you so much Guenther, for giving me a copy of your work. I absolutely adored it. A round of applause for you!  I can’t wait to read the next book. 

The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood REVIEW

The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood REVIEW

(Photo by Cerize Sicat)

Rating:

5/5 Stars 🌟

Synopsis:

Margaret Atwood takes the art of storytelling to new heights in a dazzling novel that unfolds layer by astonishing layer and concludes in a brilliant and wonderfully satisfying twist. Told in a style that magnificently captures the colloquialisms and clichés of the 1930s and 1940s, The Blind Assassin is a richly layered and uniquely rewarding experience.

It opens with these simple, resonant words: “Ten days after the war ended, my sister drove a car off the bridge.” They are spoken by Iris, whose terse account of her sister Laura’s death in 1945 is followed by an inquest report proclaiming the death accidental. But just as the reader expects to settle into Laura’s story, Atwood introduces a novel-within-a-novel. Entitled The Blind Assassin, it is a science fiction story told by two unnamed lovers who meet in dingy backstreet rooms. When we return to Iris, it is through a 1947 newspaper article announcing the discovery of a sailboat carrying the dead body of her husband, a distinguished industrialist.

For the past twenty-five years, Margaret Atwood has written works of striking originality and imagination. In The Blind Assassin, she stretches the limits of her accomplishments as never before, creating a novel that is entertaining and profoundly serious. The Blind Assassin proves once again that Atwood is one of the most talented, daring, and exciting writers of our time. Like The Handmaid’s Tale, it is destined to become a classic.

Review:

This is my second Margaret Atwood book and I have to say, I quite enjoy her works. The book made it to my favourites of the year even though it’s just May. I read this last February and I am still thinking about this book months after I read it, so I decided to write a review.

To start it off, I just want to say that this was a novel that gave me a huge wave of sadness after uncovering everything it has to offer. It’s the kind of book that’s quite hard to put into a specific genre; at first, I thought it was a coming of age story but then it could also be historical fiction as well as mystery. In several hundred pages of the book, she was able to tackle family history, sibling rivalry, obsessions, mental health, disastrous marriage, and a whole lot more. I have to say that she really has the knack of creating strong female leads with quite the personality. I enjoyed the journey with Iris all throughout this book specially with Margaret Atwood’s dark humour.

It’s mysterious and thrilling and sad most of all. This was definitely a slow burn, but I get why she had to pace it that way. Stories within a story and even newspaper articles accompany those; You must unravel them first before getting that big ending. There were moments where I thought I knew what happened and what will happen next, only to find out that I was played, and then Atwood pulled the rug under my feet.

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As you can see, I really did enjoy this book and would highly suggest it to anyone who would want to try Margaret Atwood’s work in the future. I’m pretty sure I didn’t make much sense from this review because it’s the kind of book you must read for yourself in order to understand it.

My Favorite quotes from this book:

“Beginnings are sudden, but also insidious. They creep up on you sideways, they keep to the shadows, they lurk unrecognized. Then, later, they spring.”

“The only way you can write the truth is to assume that what you set down will never be read… not even by yourself.”

“The best way to keep a secret is to pretend there isn’t one.”

“We’ll choose knowledge no matter what, we’ll maim ourselves in the process, we’ll stick our hands into the flames for it if necessary. Curiosity is not our only motive; love or grief or despair or hatred is what drives us.”

The Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic (Grishaverse) by Leigh Bardugo

The Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic (Grishaverse) by Leigh Bardugo

Synopsis:

Love speaks in flowers. Truth requires thorns.

Travel to a world of dark bargains struck by moonlight, of haunted towns and hungry woods, of talking beasts and gingerbread golems, where a young mermaid’s voice can summon deadly storms and where a river might do a lovestruck boy’s bidding but only for a terrible price.

Inspired by myth, fairy tale, and folklore, #1 New York Times–bestselling author Leigh Bardugo has crafted a deliciously atmospheric collection of short stories filled with betrayals, revenge, sacrifice, and love.

Perfect for new readers and dedicated fans, these tales will transport you to lands both familiar and strange—to a fully realized world of dangerous magic that millions have visited through the novels of the Grishaverse.

This collection of six stories includes three brand-new tales, all of them lavishly illustrated with art that changes with each turn of the page, culminating in six stunning full-spread illustrations as rich in detail as the stories themselves.

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Photo by Cerize Sicat

Rating:

🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟 / 5 stars

Review:

If you haven’t noticed it yet, I have a very dark and twisted mind that enjoy dark and twisted stories. Leigh Bardugo has never failed me with those. Though of course, for me, the Grisha Trilogy is the weakest of all. Six of Crows still reigns my favorite and very CLOSELYYYYY followed by this one. The stories she weaved sent shivers down my spine and yet I couldn’t put it down. Not to mention the fantastic artwork by Sara Kipin which is jaw dropping gorgeous that I kept staring at it and featured it numerous times in my instagram account.

We all know all about the bedtime stories of the handsome prince or the fair-haired princess of faraway lands and how their suitors must complete tasks in order to win their hand. Well, Bardugo knows that that’s not the case all the time. Sometimes dark and terrible things happen, the beautiful girl is not what you expect her to be, and not everyone gets to have a happy ending. I absolutely love dark retellings, but what I love about this one is that there’s an essence of uniqueness to it that overpowers the original story and makes it more endearing and fantastic.

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I wouldn’t give you a review of each of the stories because I feel I might give too much away, and I really want you to experience the dark stories for yourself. I’ve arranged everything from my favorite to least. 😊

  1. The Witch of Duva – Absolutely fantastic! Quite disturbing, yes. But fantastic! THIS GAVE ME CHILLS. My mouth is literally hanging open after reading it that I had to remind myself to close it.
  2. When Water Sang Fire
  3. The Too-Clever Fox
  4. Ayama and the Thorn Wood
  5. The Soldier Prince
  6. Little Knife – It bore me for a bit. It’s interesting but not at par with the others.

As you can see, I’ve enjoyed the book so much. I recommend this to anyone who enjoys retellings like I do. If you haven’t read any of Leigh’s book, that’s also fine as this doesn’t rely heavily on her Grisha world or characters. And before I end this review, I just want to share some of my favorite lines from the book.

“So shut the window tight and make sure the latch is fastened. Dark things have a way of slipping in through narrow spaces.”

“Come now, Ayama. You know how the stories go. Interesting things only happen to pretty girls;”

“She held each sorrow like a chafing grain and grew her grudges like pearls.”

“Magic doesn’t require beauty,’ she said. ‘Easy magic is pretty. Great magic asks that you trouble the waters. It requires a disruption, something new.”

Thank you for reading! 😊

Finding Chika by Mitch Albom Review

Finding Chika by Mitch Albom Review

Photo by Cerize Sicat

Synopsis:

Bestselling author Mitch Albom returns to nonfiction for the first time in more than a decade in this poignant memoir that celebrates Chika, a young Haitian orphan whose short life would forever change his heart.Chika Jeune was born three days before the devastating earthquake that decimated Haiti in 2010. She spent her infancy in a landscape of extreme poverty, and when her mother died giving birth to a baby brother, Chika was brought to The Have Faith Haiti Orphanage that Albom operates in Port Au Prince.With no children of their own, the forty-plus children who live, play, and go to school at the orphanage have become family to Mitch and his wife, Janine. Chika’s arrival makes a quick impression. Brave and self-assured, even as a three-year-old, she delights the other kids and teachers. But at age five, Chika is suddenly diagnosed with something a doctor there says, “No one in Haiti can help you with.”Mitch and Janine bring Chika to Detroit, hopeful that American medical care can soon return her to her homeland. Instead, Chika becomes a permanent part of their household, and their lives, as they embark on a two-year, around-the-world journey to find a cure. As Chika’s boundless optimism and humor teach Mitch the joys of caring for a child, he learns that a relationship built on love, no matter what blows it takes, can never be lost.Told in hindsight, and through illuminating conversations with Chika herself, this is Albom at his most poignant and vulnerable. Finding Chika is a celebration of a girl, her adoptive guardians, and the incredible bond they formed — a devastatingly beautiful portrait of what it means to be a family, regardless of how it is made.

Rating:

🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟 / 5 stars

Review:

This is heart-wrenching and my first 5 star read for 2020. I cried so much that my eyes were puffy when I went to work, and my co-worker asked why my eyes are swollen and I said, “Because I read Mitch Albom’s new book and I couldn’t stop crying last night”.

I loved how Mitch told Chika’s journey, starting from the very beginning until her last breath. It’s always so difficult to read about dying children because they have not experienced life to the fullest, and yet they are one of the strongest when it comes to battling life. And it is so heart breaking because no one should ever experience that. I can’t imagine the pain DIPG has given Chika. It’s amazing how much courage a child has. Just imagining all those hospital trip, surgeries, and medicine is enough to make an adult feel helpless but not Chika. For such a small body, she is radiating with courage. I always wondered if Mitch and Janine have children and this answered it. He told us how he was so focused on accepting jobs for the fear that no one would take him again, how they became stand in parents of their nephews and nieces, and how Janine cried on Christmas mornings. It was so raw and honest; it gave me a punch to the gut. I really appreciate that he included some of that private information about their life because it makes you understand it more.

All in all, this is a good book about life and the making of a small family. I would suggest you have a handkerchief ready when you read this book. It’s a breath of fresh air when I read his work; A break from all the murder-mystery, fiction, and fantasy books that I always gravitate to. He makes me cry most of the time, but there are always lessons and positivity in those pages which I always look for.

Divan of Shah by Shah Asad Rizvi

Divan of Shah by Shah Asad Rizvi

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Rating:

3/5 stars 🌟

 

Synopsis:

The Divan of Shah represents an unconscious longing for union within. The author tapped into the collective unexplored and perhaps his own realm of dreams. He ascribed those thoughts and feelings into poetry. This one is a thoughtful collection of poetic lines that invites the reader into the dimension of love, which happens to be the idea of a reflective mirror having no color yet for all colors of the embodiment are reflected.

 

Review:

I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

Thank you so much Shah for giving me a copy of your book! This is my first read for 2020 and I was not expecting to receive an arc this early in the year. I feel so honored!

I’ve read several poetry books before and I have to say that this is probably the first poetry book I’ve encountered that is overflowing with content. There’re a hundred and six poems in here. They are beautiful and easy to comprehend. I felt a connection to some of them, however, there are also some poems that felt a bit off for me. I appreciate that he writes so passionately about dance and it shows in his work. I just wish that the poems were arranged in a way that makes sense. I think they’re all jumbled but there are times where I feel as if there’s a pattern and it somehow tells a story and then it goes off and the pattern is broken.

Overall though I think that it’s good, but it could have been better with a few tweaks here and there. I think the author really loves what he is doing, and I would encourage for him to continue writing. I would love to suggest this book to my friends who love reading poetry books.

Thank you again, Shah! And well done.

Go ahead and add it to your Goodreads shelf: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48696047-divan-of-shah

Get it on Amazon:                                                                  https://www.amazon.com/Divan-Shah-Asad-Rizvi/dp/1687673586

 

ARC Review: Rise of the Wolves (The Chronopoint Chronicles #2) by J.E. Reed

ARC Review: Rise of the Wolves (The Chronopoint Chronicles #2) by J.E. Reed

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Rating:

3.25 / 5 stars

 

Synopsis:

 

He’s been watching…

Kiuno stands on the frontlines. She’s battled grueling trials, crippling heartache, and the horrendous monsters of the realms. But looming shadows tell her the battle is far from over.

Monstrous forces are gathering with the intent to tear them all apart. Whispers of war and betrayal increase unrest among the alliances, and rumors of the lightning user are spreading.

They need to reach the end of this wretched game, but it’ll take an army and with the leaders at odds, can anyone bring them together?

Review:

I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

I would like to say that I was kind of surprised that I still remember what happened in the first book even though I’ve read the first one months and months ago. I don’t remember ALL of it, but I do remember a lot. I got some problem remembering some of the characters, but it all came back to me the more I read.

For me this was better than the first book. I really saw an improvement in the characters and how the story continues. I still can’t relate to Kiuno though. I don’t get her at all. The writing is still good. But what I really noticed was how the way the characters talked/conversed with each other. They were all from the present but unfortunately, they were sucked into a game called Chronopoint and then time passed – a year from what I remember because someone was keeping track of the days – and they are still stuck in Chronopoint but the way they talked changed dramatically in a short period of time. I mean, the way they converse was not natural. There were parts in the book where they were talking as if they are in medieval time.

I liked what happened to Reece, though I was kind of already expecting that from the very beginning of the second book. I loved the wedding scene because KJ and Palindrome are my favorite characters in this book. Also, Maltack! Maltack is the sweetest. And the ending was a really great way to end this book. That was a nice cliff hanger.

Overall, I think this was a huge improvement than the last one and Running with Wolves was already good so that says a lot. I would really suggest this to all readers who enjoy these kinds of stories. My gamer, fantasy, fight-scene-lover readers out there, I urge you to read this one. This one is tailored for you.

Congratulations J.E. Reed for creating another wonderful book! Will be waiting for the third one for sure.

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If you want to read my review of the first book, Running with Wolves. The link is here: https://unravelthestory.wordpress.com/2019/02/26/arc-review-running-with-the-wolves-by-j-e-reed/

 

Thank you so much for reading!

Guilty Reader Book Tag

Guilty Reader Book Tag

Hello everyone! I’ve been gone for soooooo long. I’ve missed writing reviews and short blogs but life has been very busy and i’ve been stuck in a major book slump. I think it’s best to end my two month long blog hiatus with a reader book tag!

Thank you so much to Mara of Mara’s Folded Pages for tagging me! I wasn’t expecting anyone to tag me on anything here and I feel so honored.

Let’s start!

Have you re-gifted a book you’ve been given?

I have, as a matter of fact. If the book did not impress me but if someone else enjoys reading books of the same topic or would benefit them, then i’d gift it to them.

Have you said you’ve read a book you actually haven’t?

I have lol! I forgot which book it was but I remember it’s a classic.

Have you borrowed a book and not returned it?

No. That’s one of my pet peeves. I HATE it when someone borrows my books and never returns it or if it’s given back in bad condition. I really make sure to return books as soon as possible and at the same condition it was lent to me.

Have you read a series out of order?

Okay don’t judge me, I have but it was an honest mistake! It was the Shatter Me Series by Tahereh Mafi and the Grisha Trilogy by Leigh Bardugo. When I read the first chapter of the books, I was so confused and couldn’t relate to any of the characters. I stopped and went to google the books and guess what I saw! I GOT THE WRONG ONE. *cries out of stupidity* I bought the second book (Unravel Me / Seige and Storm) because I thought it was the first one.

In my defense, I never search them before buying/reading because I almost always see reviews and get spoiled lol. Learn from my mistake guys haha.

Have you spoiled a book for someone?

I think I have by accident. I give them bits and pieces about it but nothing major. I don’t like being spoiled about a book so I don’t do it to someone else.

Have you dog eared a book?

Neveerrrr.

Have you told someone you don’t own a book when you do?

Yes. When I know they want to borrow it and i’ve had an experience with them not returning my book or ruining my copy. Sorry peeps, those things cost money.

Have you told someone you haven’t read a book when you have?

Hmmm. I don’t think I have.

Have you skipped a chapter or a section of a book?

Nope. Even though it’s long and boring *Cough* Les Miserables *Cough* I really take time to read it. It sometimes takes me months to finish it.

Have you bad mouthed a book you actually like?

Yeah. There are times that I meet other book dragons and they hate a specific book that I like. I don’t like disagreeing with people so I just nod my head yes.

That’s the end of my Guilty Reader Book Tag. Thank you so much for reading my post. Do you like this kind of posts? If so, comment down below and I’ll tag you next time. I’m so interested on reading these kind of posts, it’s like a cold refreshing drink at the end of a hot day.

I’m tagging my fellow book bloggers whose posts I absolutely enjoy: Adele of Adele Is Reading, Sara of The Bibliopagist, and Tita Pryn of Princess and Pages.

The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side by Agatha Christie Book Review

The Mirror Crack’d from Side to Side by Agatha Christie Book Review

Rating:

🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟 / 5

Synopsis:

One minute, silly Heather Badcock had been gabbling on at her movie idol, the glamorous Marina Gregg. The next, Heather suffered a massive seizure. But for whom was the deadly poison really intended?

Marina’s frozen expression suggested she had witnessed something horrific. But, while others searched for material evidence, Jane Marple conducted a very different investigation – into human nature.

Review:

I honestly thought that I wouldn’t like this one but alas, here I am giving it a whopping 5 stars. Judging the book by its cover again. 😅

When it comes to Agatha Christie’s books, I really prefer Hercule Poirot to Miss Marple but in this one, Christie didn’t involve much of Miss Marple on the scenes which surprisingly works. I think there’s a total of 20 pages max for Miss Marple, but of course she’s still the one to crack the case.

I got so invested with the story of this one that I couldn’t even put the book down. I loved why the book is titled “The Mirror Crack’d”. The story behind it is so fascinating:

“The mirror crack’d from side to side: ‘The doom has come upon me,’ cried the Lady of Shalott. Well, that’s what she looked like.”

She quoted The Lady of Shallot as the expression of Marina – the actress who was hosting the party. It was a strange description of her expression that got me so curious. I kept asking ‘What/Who did she saw?’ and I absolutely enjoyed the ending! I was satisfied with the answers in the end. I didn’t see it coming to be honest. It was quite a ride.

There’s a complexity in the story that I liked and a hint of something different that I truly enjoyed. This has a low rating on goodreads but I liked it, so of course I would recommend it to anyone looking for a mystery novel to read. 🧡

Favorite lines from the book:

“She couldn’t let the past go and she could never see the future as it really was, only as she imagined it to be.”

“In my experience, bossy women seldom get themselves murdered. I can’t think why not. When you come to think of it, it’s rather a pity.”

“If you look into somebody’s soul by accident, you feel a bit embarrassed about cashing in.”

Book Review of The Hate U Give By Angie Thomas

Book Review of The Hate U Give By Angie Thomas

Rating:

5 / 5 🌟

Synopsis:

Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed.

Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil’s name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr.

But what Starr does—or does not—say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life.

Review:

This is one incredibly gripping and sad book but is also filled to the brim with hope. Starr’s journey is not all bright and happy, because it’s the exact opposite of it. We were with her in the passenger seat when Khalil was shot, we were there when she got handcuffed, pointed a gun at, questioned, and threatened. It was all grim and infuriating, yes. But we were also there when Starr decided that enough is enough and that she’ll finally speak up. We felt her pain and anger. Angie Thomas made us feel it. She placed us smack in the middle of it like a teacher telling her class to listen and learn. And I did learn. And I picked up a lot.

There was one line that really got me, “Funny how it works with white kids though. It’s dope to be black until it’s hard to be black.” And that shit is so true on so many levels. This doesn’t limit itself on the white people, because Asians are so guilty of this too. Mind you, I’m Filipino and half of my family doesn’t even get what racism is all about. And I try so damn hard to educate them by sneaking some movies that tackles relevant and timely issues.

I’m so effing glad that I picked this book up. I’m not gonna lie, I watched the movie first and I fell in love with it that’s why I was extremely excited to read it. It broke my heart, made me cry, laugh, then cry some more. It’s a story that’s relevant and speaks volume that makes you want to lead a protest ala Starr Carter. I’m happy to see that Angie Thomas also injected the minority alliance in the story between Starr and Maya. Yass Queen, we love some Asian and Black friendship. 🧡🙌🏽

This is not the first book i’ve read about racial profiling and this definitely wouldn’t be the last one. I somehow couldn’t put my feelings into words and I know I’m not doing it justice but just bear in mind that I absolutely loved it. I can’t wait to read the second book!

Favorite lines from the book:

“Sometimes you can do everything right and things will still go wrong. The key is to never stop doing right.”

“What’s the point of having a voice if you’re gonna be silent in those moments you shouldn’t be?”

“What is Tumblr anyway? Is it like Facebook?”
“No, and you’re forbidden to get one. No parents allowed. You guys already took over Facebook.”
“You haven’t responded to my friend request yet.”
“I know.”
“I need Candy Crush lives.”
“That’s why i’ll never respond.”